Bike Routes and Sharing


Bike route sign in downtown HuntingtonBeginning in 2016, Huntington residents and visitors will be able to enjoy a full seven miles of greenway trails connecting the city’s downtown area, parks, schools, and other points of interest. The city is working to complete two more phases of the greenway, adding an additional four- and-half miles to the already completed Lime City Trail, a one-mile stretch.

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This year the city will concentrate on completing more of the Little River Trail, an east-to-west route running from Jefferson Street downtown to the Erie Rail Trail Bridge that was rehabilitated in 2015. The second segment earmarked for completion this year is part of the Erie Rail Trail, a north-south route going from Market Street to Huntington University. Although not all the trails are connected, plans are in the works to connect all trails in the very near future.

In addition, the City will launch a bike-sharing program this summer in partnership with Zagster. 

Additional work will include a “road diet” along Old U.S. Route 24. The slimmer entryway into Huntington will include 10-foot-wide trail lanes connecting with the Erie Rail Trail.

“We believe that our growing greenway system is very important to our community,” says Anthony Goodnight, Director of Public Works and Engineering Services. “It’s not just important for our current residents, it’s also something that could attract new business and additional jobs to the area.  The quality of life a community offers is very important to companies looking to expand or relocate their operations.”

“Having this trail system promotes health and wellness for our citizens by providing them a great reason to get out of the house and really appreciate how beautiful our city is,” Goodnight adds.

“We want people to love living in Huntington.”

Almost all the funding for the greenway has been generated locally by a city Redevelopment Commission Tax Increment Financing (TIF) bond issue. Additional money to help Huntington’s trails in the future is being raised by the Huntington Area Recreational Trail Association (HARTA), which is dedicated to raising awareness of the trail system and to helping people lead healthier lifestyles. Through a $10,000 matching grant from the Lilly Foundation and other fundraising efforts, HARTA has raised $30,000 for amenities.

In the future, people using the Huntington greenway may well be able to embark on longer trips to neighboring communities.

“I think it’s definitely feasible to connect  our trails with trail systems in other communities, such as Wabash and Fort Wayne,” Goodnight says. “Initiatives such as Regional Cities will help in making that happen.”

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